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Hollins University
Graduate Center
PO Box 9603
Roanoke, VA 24020-1603
(540) 362-6575
(540) 362-6288 (Fax)
hugrad@hollins.edu

Courses

ENG 501, 502: Graduate Creative Writing Tutorial I, II (4,4) Brown, Dillard, Hankla, Larsen, Moeckel, Poliner
Graduate tutorial seminars in the form and theory of contemporary writing practice, with attention to the writing of the students in the class. The exact contents of any given seminar will be determined by the needs and interests of its members. Limited to graduate students in the creative writing program.

ENG 506: How Writing is Written (4) Hankla
An exploration of the creative process of poetry and fiction writing. The course will include readings of literature and works by writers on their art and craft, writing assignments, and discussion of student work.

ENG 507, 508: Advanced Creative Writing (4,4) Brown, Dillard, Poliner
A workshop course in the writing of prose and poetry. Selected works by students will be read and discussed. Frequent conferences.

ENG 511, 512: Graduate Creative Writing Tutorial III, IV (4,4) Brown, Dillard, Hankla, Larsen, Poliner
Graduate tutorial seminars in the form and theory of contemporary writing practice, with attention to the writing of the students in the class. The exact contents of any given seminar will be determined by the needs and interests of its members. Limited to second-year graduate students in the creative writing program.

ENG 519: The Jazz Aesthetic in Literature (4) Anderson
This course explores the development of literature (poetry, fiction, autobiography, etc.) that employs a “jazz aesthetic.” The philosophical/aesthetic role that jazz improvisation has played in the development of Modernist and Post- Modernist critique will also be examined. Artists discussed include Charles Mingus, Jack Kerouac, Bob Kaufman, Amiri Baraka, Nathaniel Mackey, Miles Davis, Anthony Braxton, Jayne Cortez, and several others. The course entails the development of a creative and critical portfolio of jazz-inspired writing. Not offered 2013–14.

ENG 521: Screenwriting (4) Dillard
An intensive hands-on course in the art of writing for the screen, for beginners and for writers experienced in other genres (fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction). Screenings, writing exercises, and workshop-style critiques comprise the course. Not offered 2013-14.

ENG 523: Cinematic Adaptation (4) Dillard
Students go through the entire process (from analysis of the story to outline to treatment to screenplay) of adapting a work of fiction for the screen. The course also includes close study of works of fiction that have previously been adapted for the cinema, as well as the resulting screenplays and films.

ENG 524: Poetry in Performance (4) Anderson
This course examines the aesthetics of textual performance as it has been applied to the performative aspect of poetry. Students will develop methods of critiquing and perform a broad range of aesthetic expression that incorporates poetry with other media. Poets to be discussed include Jayne Cortez, Ed Sanders, and several others. This course is a composite seminar/practicum.

ENG 550: Advanced Seminar in Fiction Technique (4) Poliner
This seminar is designed to improve the skills of fiction writers and to provide a solid and sophisticated foundation in fiction technique. Emphasis will be on the use of writing exercises to focus on elements of fiction technique, including narration, dialogue, scene, description, word choice, and setting. Students will also analyze published fiction, and critique their own work in progress.

ENG 550: The Problem with Memoir (4) McElmurray
We will begin by examining "traditional" memoir, including works by Mary Karr, Mark Doty, and Greg Bottoms, with an eye to questions about the form. What makes a good memoir "good" or "noteworthy?" What is "over-sharing" and what is translation of personal experience via art? How do metaphor, courage, memory, and truth-telling all come into play in the writing of a well told story about a life? We will also discuss several memoirs that are deliberately "problematic" in their challenges via style, structure and content. The course will require both analytical writing and creative work.

ENG 553: Film as a Narrative Art (4) Dillard
Films of Stanley Kubrick as moral, aesthetic, and psychological narratives, with particular attention to the development of cinematic style in relationship to his concerns throughout his career. Such films as Fear and Desire, Killer’s Kiss, The Killing, Paths of Glory, Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, Eyes Wide Shut.

ENG 554: Film as a Narrative Art (4) Dillard
ilms of Orson Welles as moral, aesthetic, and psychological narratives, with particular attention to the development of cinematic style in relationship to his concerns throughout his career. Such films as Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, The Stranger, The Lady From Shanghai, Macbeth, Othello, Mr. Arkadin, Touch of Evil, The Trial, Chimes at Midnight, F for Fake.

ENG 567: Cross-Genre and Experimental Writing (4) Hankla
An examination of and practice in forms of writing that straddle the worlds of fiction/poetry, image/word, fiction/nonfiction, including graphic memoir and fictional (auto)biography. Students will write prose poems, flash fiction, and other experimental forms, while considering selected works by Gertrude Stein, Lydia Davis, Jamaica Kincaid, James Tate, Michael Ondaatje, Alison Bechdel, and many others. Not offered 2013-14.

ENG 569: Pedagogy and Practice of Creative Writing (2) Moeckel
The pedagogical background and practical application of creative writing for the college classroom. Students will research pedagogical materials and texts, build syllabi, work one-on-one with peer mentors, engage in practice teaching, and learn institutional practices pursuant to college level teaching. Limited to MFA-CW program Teaching Fellows and Graduate Assistants by permission.

ENG 584: Advanced Studies in Poetry (4) Larsen
An intensive exploration of poetry, focusing on contemporary writers from the United States. Can poetry, really, matter? How does it mean now? Is craft dead, murderous, of the essence? How do past poets speak through/ against/around writers of our time? Is aesthetic progress possible? What are the orthodoxies, transgressions, blunders of the age?

ENG 585: Advanced Studies in the Novel (4) Dillard
Studies in the form of the novel, ranging throughout the history of the novel. Close readings of a variety of novels with an effort to determine the demands of the form and ways in which it has been and can be developed.

ENG 586: Advanced Studies in Creative Nonfiction (4) Trethewey
This is a course on the literary form that has come to be known as "Creative Nonfiction." We’ll read and discuss various modes of writing about personal experience and the aesthetic and ethical issues raised by such writing. Written assignments include discursive prose as well as students’ original creative nonfiction. Not offered 2013-14.

ENG 587: Advanced Studies in Short Fiction (4) Poliner
Close readings of representative stories past and present that define or defy our expectations for the form. Attention to building a vocabulary for discussion and to the analysis of technique and structure. Includes focused study of several contemporary masters of the form. Not offered 2013-14.

ENG 599: Thesis (8) Department
A collection of original work: poetry, fiction (short fiction or a novel), screenplay, play, or an appropriate grouping of more than one genre.

Other Courses Open to Creative Writing

Graduate Students Students in the Hollins M.F.A. program in creative writing may also draw from a variety of courses across the curriculum. Most choose their elective courses from upper-level courses offered by the English department, which may be taken at the graduate level for graduate credit. During the 2013-14 academic year, the courses include:

  • ENG 303: Literary History and Theory I
  • ENG 313: Literature Of The Renaissance
  • ENG 317: Medieval Literature
  • ENG 320: Immigrant Literature
  • ENG 333: Shakespeare’s Women
  • ENG 335: Milton
  • ENG 342: Advanced Studies in Children’s Literature – Speculative Feminists
  • ENG 350: Advanced Studies in Shakespeare
  • ENG 350: The Gothic Novel
  • ENG 350: Wit and Wisdom in 18th Century British Literature
  • ENG 356: Contemporary U.S. Poetry
  • THEA 364: Playwriting